Manos Hadjidakis

manos

Composer (1925 – 1994)

His name is known all over the world. He is one of the greatest pioneers of modern Greek music who set the foundations of classical and folk Greek music as well as Entekhno, a new style of music. His eminence in the Greek musical world is comparable to that of Mikis Theodorakis.

Hadjidakis started playing the piano at the age of 4. He studied music and philosophy in the University of Athens but did not obtain a degree. During the axis occupation in WWII, he worked as a heaver, an ice salesman and a nurse assistant. During that time he met many important literary figures such as George Seferis, Odysseus Elytis, Angelos Sikelianos and Nikos Gatsos. Gatsos would play an important part in his career as the two became close friends and worked together for the majority of his life.

Hadjidakis’ debut in music was in 1944 when he composed music for the plays of Carolos Koun in the Art Theatre of Athens. This collaboration, which lasted 15 years, opened Hadjidakis’ path to composing music for theatrical plays for the National Theatre of Greece. Furthermore, he composed music for multiple ancient comedies and tragedies such as Medea, Assemblywomen, Lysistrata, Birds etc.

Hadjidakis composed classical music, music for ballet and put into music the works of famed Greek writers like Nikos Gatsos. In 1959 he helped introduce the music of Mikis Theodorakis to the public. Over the years, he scored multiple Greek and international films, most notably Michael Kakoyiannis’ Stella and Dragon, Elia Kazan’s America-America and Dusan Makavejiev’s Sweet Movie. In 1960 he was awarded the Academy Award for Best Original Song for the song Never on Sunday from the film with the same name by Jules Dassin. It marked the first time such a distinction was awarded to a non-American composer.

In 1966 Hadjidakis went to USA where he scored the Broadway musical Never on Sunday based on the aforementioned film. Additionally, he composed several unique compositions. His career in the United States further boosted his fame internationally. Upon returning to Greece in 1972, Hadjidakis occupied important cultural positions. He became director of the State Orchestra, director of the radio station “Third Program”, served as deputy director of the National Opera, and founded his own festivals and competitions to give prominence to future stars of music. Hadjidakis founded his own record company, named Sirius, and printed his own magazine dedicated to music and culture.

In 1989 he founded the “Orchestra of Colours”, a symphonic orchestra with himself as conductor. The orchestra gave 20 concerts and 12 recitals featuring renowned Greek and international soloists.

Throughout his entire lifetime he was in the epicenter of Greek music. He helped significantly rise to fame some of the most important musical figures of Greece such as Mikis Theodorakis, Nana Mouschouri and Iannis Xenakis. Until the end of his life in 1994, Manos Hadjidakis remained highly respected among the musical world and recognized as a musical genius, whose work influenced modern Greek culture more than anyone.

Bibliography

  1. Manos Hadjidakis Biography by Steve Huey. All Music. Allmusic.com. Web.
  2. Μάνος Χατζιδάκις. Σαν Σήμερα. Sansimera.gr. Web.
Advertisements
Manos Hadjidakis

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s